what’s in season: australian guide for spring

SpringI always equate spring with gardening and so I always forget that Spring is the season with the least fresh fruit and vegetables on offer.

Of course, when I think about it, Spring is a time for planting new crops not harvesting them, but it still surprises me nevertheless.

Growing up in Bathurst, Spring meant cherry blossoms and a visit from our nanna, who was a keen gardener and loved to see the cherry blossom trees around town in full bloom.

It also meant hay fever, but that’s a lot less romantic.

Now, when I think of spring I think of the little fella eating avocado. He started solids in Spring and the avocado that year was some of the best I’ve ever tasted.

Today’s post is a downloadable PDF guide to what’s in season during the Spring months. You can print it out and use when menu planning, to plan to use seasonal (and therefore cheaper) produce.

As usual, this is a general guide only – there will be local variations in climate that will affect exactly what’s in season, when.

Here are a couple of recipes from the archives that feature spring fruit and vegetables:

Click here to download the Australian fruit and vegetables seasonal list for Spring (pdf).

Spring Seasonal Fruit and Vegetable Guide Australia

Comments

  1. says

    Hi Melissa, we’re so lucky in Australia not to have that European ‘hungry gap’ in spring before the spring crops come up. Even in Tassie we can plant in Autumn and have crops ready in spring. In my little garden I have lemons, lettuce, snowpeas and red chard, and am selectively harvesting garlic tops to add a garlicky taste without the garlic.
    Broad beans and brassicas are nicest in the spring, when the winter frosts have given them an extra crunch.

    I am interested to know how apples got onto your spring list? They are in blossom in spring, and every apple we eat in spring will have been stored for several months. I think the very latest apple is harvested in July. And pumpkins? Are they harvested now in the far north maybe? All our southern pumpkins were gathered in late Autumn. Of course, they do store well and will be cheap in the shops for a couple of months yet.

    How is your compost experiment coming along? And what are you growing in your Qld garden in spring? (Assuming you have time to garden with two little ‘helpers’)

    • says

      Hi Jo, QLD growing seasons is quite different to down south – I’m still trying to get used to it (still can’t convince my FIL). Pumpkins aren’t any good in summer because they just rot in the humidity. Strawberry season starts in July, tomatoes are good to go in now (Dad and his friend used to compete to get the first tomato before Christmas – more often it was in January).

      I have to admit, when doing research for the list, I was also surprised about the apples – it’s just for Sept so I’m assuming it’s a regional thing. The apples we’ve been buying are Australian and still pretty cheap, but not so good as in late Autumn / Winter.

      I just ordered seeds yesterday for our garden. Because of the position (south facing) and the fact that it’s a very sheltered courtyard, we’re just getting sun on about 15% of the ground in the late afternoon. Stuff that I planted months and months ago is just starting to grow – amazing what a little sunlight can do!! So the microclimate in our yard means I have to adjust for whatever is ‘recommended’ for climate / region. But I figure it’s easier to shade veggies in summer than do the impossible and get sunlight in in winter :) .

      Compost is going really well, although I don’t have time to compost every day. We’re going to put in some zuchinni and lots of herbs and some beans, chillis, tomatoes… I got a bit over excited when ordering, I can’t quite remember seeds what I ordered :)

  2. says

    Well, that sheds some light on your planting list! I’m still intrigued about those September apples, though. Happy gardening for spring!

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